Difference between Too and Also

By: | Updated: Dec-12, 2017

The words “too” and “also,” as far as we know, have always been interchangeable. However, they actually have a difference and are not always interchangeable. In this article, we will discuss the difference between the two.

Summary Table

TooAlso
Usually placed at the end of the sentence; can be placed in the middle of the sentence, with commas written before and after it, in formal contexts and in responses to good wishes; placed prior to the adjective it modifies when used as a submodifier in a negative statementTypically used after the verb “to be” or prior to single verb forms; used in between the first part and second part of the verb when used in sentences that contain complex verb tenses or modal verbs; used in the beginning of the sentence when introducing another topic or a new point

Definitions

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The word too means “as well.” It is used to convey an agreeing thought in a positive sentence. It is commonly placed at the end of the sentence. Let us take a look at some examples below:

  • My mother practices veganism. Her sisters and cousins are all vegans too.
  • I love reggae music. I love indie music too.
  • Despite the negative things you hear about her and her family, Stacy was accepted at New York University. Her twin brothers, Lawrence and Ian, got in too.

In a formal context and in responses to good wishes, “too” is placed in the middle of a sentence. In this case, it is specifically written after the subject and between two commas. Let’s take a look at some examples below:

  • My father believes that the orphanage should not be closed. My mother, too, strongly believes that the institution should be given enough funds and opportunity to operate.
  • I, too, have a few words for the bride and groom.
  • We, too, have been very pleased to receive this certificate of appreciation.

The word “too” also functions as a submodifier, usually in a negative context. It is used when something is excessive or of a higher degree than what is desirable. In this case, “too” is placed before the adjective it modifies. Let us take a look at some examples:

  • This icing is too sweet.
  • Your bag is too small for all of these books.
  • Ted’s perfume is too strong.

Additionally, “too” is common in informal or daily conversations and in responses that only contains a single object pronoun. Here are some examples:

  • Gosh! I saw that too!
  • Tell Jenna I miss her too!
  • Are you going to lie to me about this too?

Also is used in positive sentences to express an agreeing thought. It is usually placed after the verb “to be” or before single verb forms. Let us take a look at some examples:

  • My son also studied in NYU.
  • Mr. Bosworth is the caretaker of the Claiborne mansion. He is also tasked with taking care of the animals on Mrs. Claiborne’s farm.
  • My specialty is gourmet bread. I also bake custom cakes.

In complex verb tenses, “also” is written between the first part and the second part of the verb. Here are some examples:

  • Uncle Marshall has also been trying to call mom.
  • Lily is also reading that book.
  • The other political candidate has also been fighting for his right.

When used in sentences with modal verbs, “also” is written between the modal verb and the second verb. Let us take a look at some examples:

  • The maid of honor should also be in the meeting.
  • Fritzie must also be included in the class list.
  • I think the spicy food we ate last night caused my diarrhea. It could also be because of the diet pills I took early this morning.

When introducing a new topic or another point, “also” is placed at the beginning of the statement. Here are some examples:

  • I don’t recommend this place because the food is really expensive. Also, it’s 3 hours away from my town and the traffic is terrible!
  • Blessy Goodheart is my favorite artist because her creations are beautiful and one-of-a-kind. Also, she only uses recycled materials to help the environment.
  • This essay perfectly describes the struggles of a solo parent living in a big city. Also, it is full of heartbreaking moments and sad thoughts that make you think.

Too vs Also

What, then, is the difference between “too” and “also”?

Both words express agreeing thoughts; however, the difference lies in their placement in the sentence.

“Too” is more commonly placed at the end of a statement. However, in formal contexts and in responses to good wishes, it is placed in the middle of the sentence. When used as a submodifier, it is used before the adjective it modifies. On the other hand, “also” is more commonly used after the verb “to be” or prior to single verb forms. When used in a sentence with complex verb tenses or modal verbs, it is placed between the first part and the second part of the verb. When used to introduce a new topic or point, it is placed in the beginning of the sentence.

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