Difference Between Additional Dose and Booster

By: | Updated: Feb-19, 2022
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Being vaccinated doesn’t mean you will be forever safe from diseases. Sometimes you need an additional or booster dose to keep your immunity.

But do you know the differences between the two of them? In this article, we will explain the key differences between additional and booster doses so that you can make an informed decision.

Additional Dose Booster Dose
Typically given to patients who have recently been vaccinated. Typically given to patients who have not been vaccinated in a while.
Typically a smaller dose than a booster dose. Typically a bigger dose.
Help increase the effectiveness of the vaccine. Increase immunity to a particular disease.
Less significant. Generally more significant.

Difference Between Additional Dose and Booster

The main difference between an additional dose and a booster dose is that an additional dose is typically given to patients who have recently been vaccinated, while a booster dose is typically given to patients who have not been vaccinated in a while.

Additionally, an additional dose is typically a smaller dose than a booster dose.

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People who have recently been vaccinated may receive an additional dose to help increase the effectiveness of the vaccine. A booster dose is typically given to people who have not been vaccinated in a while in order to increase their immunity to a particular disease.

Immunity to a particular disease may decrease over time, so a booster dose may be necessary in order to maintain protection against the disease. Additionally, a booster dose may be necessary if the patient has had a decrease in immunity due to an illness or other condition.

Illness or other conditions may also require that a patient receive a booster dose of a vaccine. For example, patients who have received the HPV vaccine may need to receive a booster dose if they have not been infected with HPV.

Booster dose is generally more significant than an additional dose. The dose increase helps the person’s immune system to remember the vaccine and be prepared if there is a future exposure to the disease.

Disease outbreaks may also increase the need for booster doses. For example, in 2017 there was an outbreak of mumps in the United States. This outbreak led to an increase in the number of people who received a booster dose of the MMR vaccine.

Vaccine schedules may also require booster doses. For example, the Tdap vaccine is recommended for adults who are 19 years or older and need a booster dose every 10 years.

If an additional or booster dose is not given when recommended, immunity to the disease may decrease over time. This decrease in immunity may increase the risk of the person becoming infected with the disease.

Vaccine schedules and recommendations may change over time. It is important to keep up to date on the latest vaccine schedules and recommendations in order to ensure that you are receiving the appropriate additional or booster doses.

Doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals can help you to stay up to date on the latest vaccine schedules and recommendations.

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