Difference Between Ajaxstop and Ajaxcomplete

By: | Updated: May-17, 2022
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AJAX is a development tool that works on top of HTTP. It is used for making client-side web applications, which means it can only be used for web pages and not mobile websites, or other applications.

When you use AJAX, you’ll find 2 different instructions when you already finish the process. This process includes when you send the information to the server and also getting the information to the server.

Those 2 different modes are Ajaxstop and Ajaxcomplete. In this article, we will discuss the differences between those two.

Ajaxstop Ajaxcomplete
Process finish, result appear Finish process, result hasnt appeared yet
Not able to send more than 1 request Able to send more than 1 request
Able to use time parameter Unable to use time parameter

Difference Between Ajaxstop and Ajaxcomplete

What Is Ajaxstop?

Ajaxstop is an event handler which takes place after the Ajax request has completed. It uses jQuery’s success() callback function to display a web page message.

 

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In some cases, you may want to display a different message on your web page. This means the request from the server is already finished.

What Is Ajaxcomplete?

Ajaxcomplete is an event handler which takes place before the Ajax request has completed. The result has not shown up in the screen yet. But basically the process is finished. It uses jQuery’s success() callback function to display a web page message.

In some cases, ajaxComplete appears when the process to the server is already done, but no result shows up at this point. If you want to distinguish between the request types, you can use the parameter instead.

How Are They Related?

Both Ajaxstop and Ajaxcomplete will process the same steps. When an AJAX request is complete, jQuery checks to see if any other AJAX requests are pending. The function that appears after an AJAX request is finished will run even if there are no other pending requests.

The Ajax stop event can be triggered on the success of an asynchronous request to the server. The page is displayed with a message to let the user know that there is no response yet.

If you want to display a custom message, you can use the $.Deferred object’s success function, which will send a message to the page when all tasks are completed. The Ajaxcomplete event works in the same way as Ajaxstop, but it will be fired when the server returns an empty result set.

It is possible that you do not need both events; however, if you have to distinguish between two types of responses from your server, then you can use them in different parts of your code.

Ajaxstop vs Ajaxcomplete

Ajaxstop happens when the Ajax request has completed. It uses jQuery’s success() callback function to display a web page message. In some cases, you may want to display a different message on your web page. This means the request from the server is already finished.

While ajaxstop is a notification for you that the entire process has already been done. The server also stopped processing. It can be used to show any error message or status of your Ajax request at the time of completion and it does not affect other requests. In contrast, Ajaxstop is only a notification for you that all processes have completed and no more data will be sent to the server.

On the other side, ajaxComplete appears when the process to the server is already done, but no result shows up at this point. If you want to distinguish between the request types, you can use the parameter instead.

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