Difference Between Have Been and Has Been

By: | Updated: Jan-15, 2022
The contents of the Difference.guru website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material contained on this site (“Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical or legal advice. Always seek the advice of your doctor with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website!

In the world of grammar, there are many words that have similar meaning but there are few words that have very different meanings. The word “have” is one of those words. Have is a verb which means to possess or to hold something in your hand. It is used as a past tense verb and it can be used as an auxiliary verb. It is used with the present tense when you want to express past events and it is used with the past tense when you want to express future events.

Summary Table

Have Been Has Been
For first person singular or plural nouns For third person singular nouns
Four letters, ends with e Three letters, ends with s
Pronounced [hav] or [(h)əv] Pronounced [həs] or [(h)ɑːs]

Difference Between Have Been and Has Been

When we talk about tenses, we talk about how a verb is used in a sentence. Tenses are divided into past, present and future. Past tense verbs are used to talk about events that happened in the past. Present tense verbs are used to talk about things that are happening right now or will happen in the future. Future tense verbs are used to talk about things that will happen in the future.

In this case, verbs like “have” are also affected by the rules of tenses. The rules of tenses are very simple. They are applied to verbs only. In this case, “have” is also a verb.

In addition, the word “have” is a verb which means to possess or to hold something in your hand. This means that the verb is a singular form of the verb. However, we can also use “has” in a sentence as a verb. The differences between “have” and “has” lay on the fact that “has” and “have” are used for different kinds of nouns.

Difference between a Bobcat and a M... x
Difference between a Bobcat and a Mountain Lion

But what does that mean?

In this article, we will explain the difference between “have” and “has” in the context of grammar. We will also give you examples of sentences that show how “have” and “has” are used in a sentence. We will take a look at the use of “have been” and “has been”, and how they are used in a sentence.

So, let’s get started!

What is “Have Been”?

Have been is a verb form that means “to have had”, “to have been”. This form is also called the past participle. Have been can be used in two ways. It can be used as a main verb, or it can be used as an auxiliary verb. Have been has the same meaning when it is used as an auxiliary verb and main verb. In both cases, this sentence will make sense:

We went to the beach last year, but we haven’t been there since then.

I have been waiting for my friend for a long time.

When “have been” is used as an auxiliary verb, it shows that the action has happened in the past. Have been can also be used as a main verb. In this case, it means that the action has happened in the past, but we are not sure when it took place. Have been can also be used with both “has” and “have”. In this case, you will use have been to show that you are unsure about when something happened.

What is “Has Been”?

The verb “has been” is used to express the past tense of the verb “have”. It can be used in a number of different ways, depending on the situation. For example, it can be used to express that something has occurred for a long time, and is therefore considered as something that has happened many times.

It can also be used to show that an action or event has taken place in the past but you are not sure exactly when it took place. In this case, you are unsure about when it actually happened and how long ago it was. For example:

Rome has been a beautiful city for centuries.

She has been in the city for two weeks.

“Has been” can also be used to express that something has occurred, but you are not sure exactly when it happened and it is still happening now.

How are They Related?

Have and has are two words that are used to form a compound verb. When either have or has are used in a past continuous tense sentence, they form a verb that has the meaning of “to have been.” The following sentences are examples of past continuous tense:

Example 1: John has been playing the guitar for the last three hours.

Example 2: John has been sleeping in his bed for the last three hours.

Example 3: I have been living in London for the last three years.

Example 4: I have been working as a clerk for the last three years.

These sentences mean that the nouns “John” and “I” have been doing an action or been in a situation for a period of time. The verb “have” and the verb “has” have been used to form past continuous tense sentences.

The past continuous tense is used to describe an action that began in the past and continues into the present. It describes a continuous action that was completed at some point in the past.

What are the Differences?

Although both “have” and “has” are verbs, they have different uses in a sentence. Here are some differences between “have” and “has”:

The Noun

“Have been” is used to describe when something happened in the past, but the noun is a plural noun or a first person singular noun. “Has been” is used to describe when something happened in the past, but the noun is a third person singular noun.

Example:

I have been sick for a long time.

They have been looking for a new place to live.

She has been living in Paris for the past two years.

He has been the boss for many years.

The spelling

“Have been” is spelled H-A-V-E, four letters and ends with the letter e. “Has been” is spelled H-A-S, three letters and ends with the letter s.

The Pronunciation

“Have been” is pronounced [hav] or [(h)əv] while “has been” is pronounced [həs] or [(h)ɑːs].

(Visited 6 times, 1 visits today)
Did this article help you?
Thank you!
Thank you!
What was wrong?