Difference Between Periods and Groups

By: | Updated: Sep-6, 2021

We all know the feeling of confusion when we try to understand the periodic table. The main reason behind this is that the periodic table has a lot of information in it and it is difficult to comprehend all of them. But, you can easily get rid of this confusion by understanding the difference between periods and groups in periodic table.

Periodic Table is a table that shows the chemical elements in order of their atomic number. The periodic table has been used for more than 200 years and it is still being used today. It was first created by Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869. The main purpose of this table was to help chemists to understand the behavior of different elements.

The Periodic Table has been divided into periods and groups based on their similarities and differences. Periods are further divided into periods and sub-periods. The main difference between periods and groups is that the period has a fixed number of elements while the group has a variable number of elements.

The next time you take out your periodic table, take a look at the bottom row. You will see that there are groups of elements in this row. These groups are called periods.

The number of elements in each period is called the group number. The first period has one element, the second period has two elements, and so on up to the last period which has 17 elements.

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The periodic table is arranged in order of increasing atomic mass, from left to right (top to bottom). The vertical columns are periods and each period has a group number.

The periodic table is important because it shows the chemical properties of elements. It also tells us how to make new elements.

The periodic table is also important because it shows the relationships between elements. For example, we know that the element hydrogen has one electron in its outermost shell. This means that hydrogen can combine with other elements to form compounds. We also know that helium has two electrons in its outermost shell and can therefore form compounds with other elements.

In chemistry, a period is a line that represents the number of electrons in an atom. The most common example of this is the periodic table of elements. Each element has its own unique set of properties and can be found in different forms.

A group is a set of atoms that share similar properties. For example, all carbon atoms have six protons and six neutrons in their nuclei, which means they are all chemically identical. All carbon atoms are also electrically neutral, meaning they have no net charge.

They are also all chemically identical. All carbon atoms are also electrically neutral, meaning they have no net charge.

But what are periods and groups in chemistry? What are the differences between them? To answer these questions, this article will explain the definitions of periods and groups, as well as their relationship to each other.

Summary Table:

Periods Groups
In chemistry, a period is a line that represents the number of electrons in an atom A group is a set of atoms that share similar properties
Periods are the building blocks of all chemical reactions

 

A group is a set of atoms that have similar properties and behave in similar way
They are defined as a set of atoms that share the same number of valence electrons.

 

Can be determined by their physical properties, chemical reactivity, or even their appearance

Definitions:

What are Periods?

Periods are the building blocks of all chemical reactions. They are defined as a set of atoms that share the same number of valence electrons.

What is a Group?

A group is a set of atoms that have similar properties and behave in similar ways. Groups can be determined by their physical properties, chemical reactivity, or even their appearance. For example, hydrogen and oxygen form an important group because they both have one electron in their outermost shell (the first shell).

How are they similar?

Periods and groups are both ways of organizing elements into a system. They are also used to describe the behavior of atoms in chemical reactions.

How are they different?

What they represent on the Periodic Table

Firstly, we have to understand what they represent on the Periodic Table.

The elements are arranged in order of increasing atomic number, and this is called the periodicity of the table. The periods are defined by their atomic numbers. The elements with similar properties are placed together in a group, and these groups are called periods. For example, Group 1 (or period 1) consists of alkali metals such as lithium, sodium and potassium; Group 2 (or period 2) consists of alkaline earth metals such as calcium, strontium and barium; Group 3 (or period 3) consists of transition metals such as iron, cobalt and nickel; Group 4 (or period 4) consists of lanthanides such as cerium, praseodymium and neodymium.

Chemical Properties

In general, the properties of groups are similar to those of the elements in the same group. For example, Group 1 metals are all soft and reactive metals, Group 2 metals are all alkaline earth metals, and so on.

Atomic Numbers

The atomic numbers of the elements in a group are also similar. For example, Group 1 metals have atomic numbers from 1 to 4, Group 2 metals have atomic numbers from 5 to 8 and so on.

Periodic Trends

Some groups have certain trends in their properties, such as:

1) The first element in a group has a low ionization energy (the energy required to remove an electron from the atom). This is because it is more electronegative than the other elements in the group.

2) The first element in a group has a high melting point (the temperature at which it melts). This is because it is more electronegative than the other elements in the group.

3) The first element in a group has a high boiling point (the temperature at which it boils). This is because it is more electronegative than the other elements in the group.

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